Supreme court challenges the Places of Worship Act, saying it was passed in the least democratic way imaginable.

In order for them to be able to present their legal arguments, the court was urged in the petition submitted through attorney J Sai Deepak to allow them to join existing, outstanding writ petitions that are scheduled for hearing before the SC on Friday.

Supreme court challenges the Places of Worship Act, saying it was passed in the least democratic way imaginable.

The Places of Worship Act, 1992 has been challenged in court by a representative of the former royal family of Kashi. the 1992 Act was claimed to be a "textbook example of a legislation that was passed in the most undemocratic of manners possible, without any regard for fundamental rights of affected parties, in particular the right of previously colonised indigenous communities to seek reclamation of occupied religious or civilisational sites" in the application by Maharaja Kumari Krishna Priya, daughter of the current titular head of the erstwhile royal family, and two others.

In order for them to be able to present their legal arguments, the court was urged in the petition submitted through attorney J Sai Deepak to allow them to join existing, outstanding writ petitions that are scheduled for hearing before the SC on Friday.